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Dieppe at 75

Today marks the 75th anniversary of the Dieppe raid by the Canadian army. Very controversial, as to what was achieved, it is none the less, a key point in history.

The Canadians were tasked with storming the Dieppe beach, obtaining information, and getting out. It didn’t go so well, and was considered a disaster by many historians. Others consider this raid as a testing bed for what eventually became D-Day. No matter what the opinion, it was a key attack.

This year, I was able to visit Dieppe on our tour of Belgium and northern France.

On our visit, the day we were to arrive at the August 19th 1942 Memorial, we were running very late. The day before, we went back to Vimy to see the tunnels and trenches that were not open due to the 100th anniversary of the battle of Vimy ridge. And we had to drop some other travellers of our group in Arras. So we were there over two hours late. From what I could gather, the people at this memorial were waiting especially for us! The woman was very upset at our tardiness, and my girlfriend spoke to her in French and explained our situation. It seemed to mollify her. Her husband, one of the owners of the memorial, was still very welcoming. We soon learned why.

Turns out, his mother was in occupied Dieppe. The day of the raid by the Canadians, leaflets were dropped, saying “stay in your homes, be safe. This is not a raid. We are the Canadian army. We will be back”. The French held to that hope. He said, “and then in 1944, you fulfilled your promise…you came back”. As such, he holds the Canadians in very high esteem, because we came back and liberated Dieppe. Very powerful. The museum/memorial, which is an old theatre, is full of memorabilia, photos, portraits of Canadian infantry. While the old theatre held its own appeal (being a theatre type, and he allowed us to go on the stage and such), I felt both very honoured to be Canadian, and unworthy. I had no connection to the raid or liberation. Its amazing how much this man held Canadian citizens in such high esteem.

We kept our promise. We came back.

That still sticks in my memory. Photos were not permitted of the artifacts (see the link above for more information), but the man allowed me photos of the theatre itself. Maybe on a later post. We went down to the beach. These photos are of our trip down. Its no wonder the soldiers had a tough time on the rocky beach. Just walking normally was difficult; never mind having to run up it with an enemy firing at you!

And what sticks the most with this, is that the men who participated in this raid were volunteers; not professional soldiers. They gave up their lives to fight for freedom.

All photos taken with the Fuji X100T.

On the beach. Rocky, and difficult to walk on.

A soldiers view. How can anyone manage this?

Birds-eye view of the beach.

Reflected bridge

After the fireworks, and everyone left, I took the opportunity to grab this photo of the Alexandria bridge with its lights reflecting in the water of the Ottawa river.

I placed my X-Pro1 on the stone wall and made the long-ish exposure.

The works

We took in the Lac Leamy fireworks competition last night. Typically, this is an international competition over a number of weeks (Wednesdays and Saturdays) but this year, being the 150th birthday of Canada confederation, it is a Provincial competition this year. We took in Ontario last week. For a $10 fee, you can go down by the river where there is speakers to listen to the music that goes with the fireworks. This week, being a Wednesday and having other schedules, we could only make it to a free location to watch Alberta’s contribution.

I brought along the Fuji X-Pro1 with the 35 f1.4 on it, should I get some acceptable opportunities to make some pictures. The view wasn’t the best with a tree partly obscuring the view, so I went for silhouettes and other ambient shots.

La Machine

Over last weekend Ottawa was invaded…sort of.

As a part of the Canada 150 celebrations, a street theatre company, La Machine, came to town from France to put on one very large and expansive show. Involved, were two mechanical beasts – a horse dragon (Long Ma) and a spider (Kumo), operated by a team of people controlling legs, heads and other things.

They were in the city roaming about starting Thursday. Where the show started, with Kumo perched on the basilica near the art gallery of Canada. The story goes (the very short version) that Kumo steals a sacred temple from Long Ma, and he’s come to get it back. The ensuing four days has these two machines roaming the downtown core, engaging in battles. The final battle, where Long Ma gets his temple back, occurred Sunday night.

We popped down on Sunday afternoon to see some of the event. It was pretty cool and really well done. We managed to catch up and follow Long Ma to the War Museum, where Kumo was. They had a spat that send Long Ma running away to recuperate (and later that night, finally win).

All in all some fun. Apparently over the duration of the events, there was near 750,000 people who came to see the action.

Photos taken with the Fuji X-T1 and 16-55 f2.8 lens.

Stay warm

We went for a trip out to Perth, Ontario. About an hour drive from our home in Nepean, near Ottawa. I like Perth. It is a small town with a long history. As it happens, my family was originally from Perth before moving to southern Ontario, so its kind of like coming full circle, living so close.

We took in a tour of Top Shelf distillery, my favourite gin, and went to lunch at our regular spot; a Mexican food place called Mex & Co. (say it quickly to get the play). It not that there are any other places in Perth, we always end up there, and in the summer, the patio is overlooking a canal which makes for a nice setting. I took this shot. I love water reflections.

As we were there, it cooled down as a storm was approaching, and one of the servers brought out blankets if needed. A nice touch. I snapped both pictures with the Fuji X-Pro1 with the 18mm f2 lens.

Washing up

Being in the suburbs, there is a lot of wildlife around. There are a couple chipmunks that live nearby and like to gather up the bird seed that falls from the feeder. Sadly, they also like my tomatoes, so its an ongoing battle to keep them out.

Now that it’s summer, I like to keep my X-T1 and new 50-140 lens close by for any bird pictures or other fauna that comes by. So I was pleased to see the little chipmunk finding a place to clean his face. I was able to snap this picture. It looks like he is saying “I can’t see you, so you can’t see me”.

Blue Jay

So, I’m sitting outside with the Fuji X-T1 with the 50-140 by my side. I had stood up with the camera, and in comes a pair of Blue Jays to eat at the bird feeder. These have been elusive birds for me. They don’t like to stick around when humans are near and in any type of motion.

As I was standing with camera in hand, they didn’t notice me, and I didn’t need to move, so I had a great view to shoot some pictures. The lens was fantastic and I got some great pictures. The problem is, which to put online to show? Here are a few.

Planes and trains

For Canada Day weekend, its been somewhat relaxed. Between rain showers and storms, I’ve been able to be outside and realized that the title is what I’ve seen this weekend.

Planes

For the 150th anniversary of confederation of Canada, there was a planned flypast over Parliament Hill of about 40 aircraft from the Vimy Flight biplanes, the Hamilton Lancaster, to the current RCAF Globmaster III transport plane. Not one to like crowds or any lineups, I stayed away, with the hope they might pass over the house. The weather didn’t play nice, and the flypast was cancelled. As a bonus (to me), the Lancaster was only in town for the flypast. It was hanging out at the Ottawa airport. I was listening in on the Air Traffic Control to see what has going on, and I heard they were heading back to Hamilton. I had my camera and new 50-140 ready. I knew that when it left, it would come over the house. It didn’t disappoint. It always nice to see and hear that plane.

Trains

On Sunday, I planned to go for a bike ride. Being somewhat lazy and tired, I chose to go for a walk instead. I actually like to go for a bike early before all the dog walkers and people are on the paths. As I’m getting my shoes on, I hear a train go by. Its not the typical VIA Rail sounding train, and it’s not on a typical schedule. That means is the CN589 local. I grabbed my X-Pro1 and went for a walk along the track and managed to grab this as it returned from switching out the lumber dealer. The only thing not obvious in the photo, is that its actually going backwards.

 

 

To the next adventure

A few days ago was a terrific evening sky. No storm, just puffy clouds and a wonderful sunset. Being in the suburbs, seeing the sun to the horizon wasn’t going to happen, but the sky was still great.

A few planes flew over and I had my new 50-140mm f2.8 lens on the Fuji X-T1 at the ready to catch this silhouette of a jet taking travellers to some adventure.

Beaumont Hamel

While in Belgium, we visited the site/memorial of Beaumont Hamel.

The Newfoundland regiments signed up to fight for King and Country in a time when they were their own dominion, not yet a part of Canada (not until 1949). They sent a contingent over to fight, and on July 1, 1916, at the beginning of the battle of the Somme, they attacked. The Battle of the Somme was the regiment’s first major engagement, and during an assault that lasted approximately 30 minutes the regiment was all but wiped out.

Newfoundland purchased the land and preserved it and it stays to this day untouched. Shell holes and trenches remain. Although not a part of Canada yet, this is truly a Canadian place. The walking paths encircle the battlefield area and one can tour around from the Newfoundland side to the German side. From the German side, you can see a clear view of the Newfoundland position and can see how they had easy sight lines to mow down the opposition. Its terrible.

One of the cemeteries included a number of tombstones next (very close) to each other. I wondered why. I later learned that those this close together indicate comrades who died in close proximity or in the same battle together.

This is a very powerful site to visit.

The calling Caribou – iconic monument

Died in 30 minutes, brothers in arms.