Bridge

Reflected bridge

After the fireworks, and everyone left, I took the opportunity to grab this photo of the Alexandria bridge with its lights reflecting in the water of the Ottawa river.

I placed my X-Pro1 on the stone wall and made the long-ish exposure.

Under the Bridge

Today was interesting weather-wise. I woke up to the sound of a steady rain. It sounded great, and by the time I left for work, it had receded.

There was the constant threat of rain again all day, so at lunch, I took my umbrella and X100 for a walk. Basically, I was hoping for some heavy downpours to capture. The X100 is not weather resistant, but with it being six years old, I’m a little more cavalier with it than say my X-T1 or X-Pro1.

However, it was not to be. The most rain was little sprinkles; barely enough to warrant opening the umbrella, let alone trying to keep the camera dry.

I eventually came to the highway 417 overpass. Here I grabbed this neat shot. The water is the Rideau canal.

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I usually shoot in manual mode. That is, I define the shutter and aperture the camera uses, rather than letting some scientist in a lab determine the right exposure. The only downside (if you’d call it that) is I can’t quickly change exposure for a given situation. In this case, under the bridge called for a slower shutter speed and larger aperture. A few seconds after I took this shot, a young woman walked by. I thought a quick street photo might be interesting. Well, I didn’t have time to set the exposure, and the shot below resulted. I quite like it. It has a rough film appeal.

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It won’t win any awards, and I could have fixed it up in Lightroom to take away the blown out bits (which I did), but I like the original version better. It has a classic look to it.

Under the Bridge

Its getting warmer! As March moves in, the temperatures rise, and its no so bad being outside again.

Today I made my way down by the Rideau Canal locks. It’s still a bit icy in some spots as I made my way down to the Ottawa river. So I doubled back and went under the Plaza bridge, which traverses the canal. This is a really neat place – not creepy like some bridges can be. One one side is the canal, the other a seemingly art deco set of stairs and lights, and as a bonus, the remnants of the original Sapper’s Bridge, built in the early 1800s.

I always like the look of the bridge from underneath. It has that hidden city look to it, and the straight lines and angles merge well with the curves of the bridge arch and openings.

I had my trusty X100 with me, and with all the monotone colours of cement and snow, put the camera in B&W mode and took a few shots.

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The wide view looking south towards the National Arts Centre. The canal is to the right.

 

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A closer view of the stairs. Curves and lines in grand designs.

 

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If you look at the other photos, there are little archways. This is shot from one of those, looking north. The building on the right is the Chateau Laurier. I love how this photo looks like it could have been taken in 1915 as much as 2015.

 

Crossing

I take a camera with me every day. These days, the original Fuji X100 is the convenient choice. Light, small, and with its case, safe in my bag with books and other sundry.

Most days, I take pictures and its blah. Nothing. Boring. Or there is nothing that strikes me as interesting.

Some days, the image just appears in front of you. This was the case with this. The angle on the Laurier bridge with people crossing, and the low clouds called to me. And as I was framing it up, I ran the risk of losing the people on the bridge. Because shortly after, its like everyone left. See, I always take a few shots of any given thing in case the first one wasn’t right, or I missed something. In this case. I got it at the right time.

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