VIA Rail

The result

As mentioned in the previous post (yes, its been a while to follow up), I was waiting on some trains in Brockville.

While waiting, railfans who knew more than me, probably because they had scanners, showed up to wait on the trains. Yay! I was going to see *something*.

The first train rolled by, heading towards Montreal. I thought I would be all artsy, and try capturing the old luggage trolley in the shot. Kind of a old/new thing.

New power, old ways.

Not bad, I guess. I would have liked a few more locomotives in the lead. I figured that was it and relaxed to watch the train go by. Then the DPU (Distributed Power Unit) came along, and I quickly snapped it. The DPU is a way to help in moving the train to put less strain on the couplers and better apply the air needed for breaking, especially in winter. Its all remote controlled.

With that train gone, the wait was on again. There was a VIA train from Montreal scheduled but it was about 30 minutes behind schedule. I was told there would be a couple of freight trains in the morning, so I kept waiting. The VIA site was giving updates. I figured I’d waited this long, what’s a bit more. Then hope appeared on the horizon, as the signal changed.

A railfan’s ray of hope – a green light.

It eventually showed up, and being on the platform, I had a great view.

VIA trains now have locomotives at both ends. Saves time on turning the train. With it stopped, the end unit was in full view. As it departed, I got the end locomotive; an older but classic VIA locomotive.

End of train. Note the red placard in the coupler.

As it left, it was getting close to 12:30 and I figured maybe it was time to head home. I looked out over the signals, and sure enough, a green showed. Maybe one more. Soon after, the railfans came back (they had left after the last freight), so I knew something would show. Shortly after it did.

Again, only one locomotive in the lead. There was a DPU, but I elected not to shoot it.

After that, the railfans left and I figured it was time to head back to Ottawa.

Given the general lack of any interesting trains in my area, the three I did see were a nice change. Search through this blog and you will see a number of shots of the typical freight one can expect.

And railfanning is a bit like fishing. You go out to see what you can catch. Some days are better than others, but its the thrill of the waiting that is half the fun.

The best laid plans

This weekend I planned to catch a train. Typically, there is a train on Sunday that delivers cars to a couple of industries. It’s an out-and-back move so there is always a chance of seeing it twice. It is an unscheduled train, so catching it is always hit-and-miss, mostly miss.

I figured on this Sunday, I would endevour to try to get the train and photographic not once, but at least twice.

The Plan

In the morning, there are a three VIA trains before noon. One at 7:30, 9:35 and 11:00. I know this because my house is right across the street from the tracks. Any freight movement usually happens between those train times. On this Sunday, I planned to head to Fallowfield station, catch the 9:35 come in and go, and hopefully catch the freight train. The station is a mere seven minutes from my house and has the benefits of signals to know when something is coming.

My plan was to get to the station around 9:15 or so, watch the VIA train, then wait on the local. It would come by soon afterwards (it has in the past). Once the local went by the station (and photographed), I would drive out to the rail bridge to catch it on its return to Walkley yard. I checked the batteries in the camera. I have a battery grip which gives me two batteries, twice the charge. The grip battery is gone so I set it to charge. The other, at 3/4 charge, should be good for a short hour of potential shots.

The Reality

As I enjoy my breakfast, I opened some windows to hear if anything went by. The local freight doesn’t blow it’s horn, and is quieter than the VIA trains. Sure enough, at 8:45, I hear a train go by (30+ years of watching trains means I have a keen ear to them coming).

EARLY! Run upstairs, get dressed, grab the camera and head to Fallowfield station. Other moves to Kott Lumber have meant a turn of only 20 minutes. Time is of the essence!

I get to the station and wait. During that time,  I grab a picture down the line heading east to show off the not-level right-of-way.

I wait long enough that the VIA passenger train is due. Okay, no big deal. The local has gone up to Richmond and waited at the passing siding for the via train.

A few minutes late, the VIA train arrives. Being on a platform, I get low and get this shot:

I’m quite happy with this. It’s what I had in mind. I’m also glad its a FP40 rather than the newer P-42s, which are just ugly.

I always question my thought patterns, and I wonder if I heard the train going back to the yard vs. going to the switching work. But as the VIA train approached, the signals turned from red, to flashing yellow (caution) to green. That tells me that something was on the tracks ahead and the VIA train should be careful, to the line is clear.

The VIA train leaves. I wait. And I wait. I wait for what should be the time it takes to return. So after 20 minutes waiting, I wander over to a memorial to people killed in a bus/train collision three years ago, then head to the car. The signals are still red.

I decide to drive over to Kott lumber and the other feed industry to see if anything was done and I misheard the train that went by the house. Its about 10:30. Next VIA train due at 11:00. On the approach to the crossing, the gates and lights are activated. What? The VIA train is coming from Ottawa – the other direction. I get to the crossing in time to see the local returning with its tow of cars. Argh!!! No photo for me!!

Another miss. So close.